Achieving All Aspects of Aichi Target 11 & Canada’s Biodiversity Target 1 – How Will We Know We’ve Achieved Our Goals?  Second Session

Explorer Hotel – Yellowknife, Northwest Territories
October 24 – 27, 2016

WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FORM

CCEA members are invited to stay for the 2016 Annual General Meeting the morning of October 28, 2016.

Dual focus of the workshop

(i) Equitably managed protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures, (ii) well-connected and integrated into wider landscapes and seascapes.

Context of the Workshop

At the 10th meeting of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Convention on Biological Diversity in 2010, the Parties adopted a Strategic Plan for Biodiversity 2010-2020.  Target 11 from this plan (Aichi Target 11) relates to protected areas and states:

“By 2020, at least 17 per cent of terrestrial and inland waters, and 10 per cent of coastal and marine areas, especially areas of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services, are conserved through effectively and equitably managed, ecologically representative and well-connected systems of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures, and integrated into wider landscapes and seascapes.”

Canada has developed parallel biodiversity goals and targets for 2020, including Canada’s Biodiversity Target 1, which mirrors Aichi Target 11. CCEA has hosted three national workshops to develop science-based guidance on reporting on the numerical aspects of Target 11/Target 1 (2013 in Ottawa, 2014 in Winnipeg and 2015 in Edmonton), particularly on the definition of ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’. This guidance, including case studies, will be published as the Canadian Guidebook for the Application and Reporting of IUCN Protected Area Categories and Other Effective Area-based Conservation Measures.

Beyond the numerical aspects of Target 11/Target 1, there are several equally important qualitative aspects. Evidence presented at the 2014 IUCN World Parks Congress clearly showed that effectiveness at stemming biodiversity loss is as important as the quantity of protected areas. Yet the qualitative aspects, which are fundamental to each of these targets, have received less attention than the quantitative elements.  These elements are related to where areas are placed, whether they are effectively managed, and whether they are well connected, representative, and integrated into wider landscapes and seascapes.

A key component to achieving all aspects of Target 11/Target 1 is the assessment of how well those aspects are currently being achieved. Being able to identify gaps, if they exist, is crucial to understanding where further efforts should be focussed and to building support to address these gaps. At its February 2016 national workshop in Fredericton, the CCEA started to look at how Canada can measure these qualitative aspects at a national scale.  However, more work remains to be done.  In Fredericton, the focus was on areas of particular importance for biodiversity; effective management; ecological representation; and the connectedness of systems.

To completely address how well the qualitative aspects are currently being achieved, the Canadian Council on Ecological Areas (CCEA) is hosting a second national workshop on the theme of “Achieving All Aspects of Aichi Target 11 & Canada’s Target 1 – How Will We Know We’ve Achieved Our Goals?  Second Session”  This workshop will focus on the aspects not examined in-depth in Fredericton; specifically equitably managed and well-connected systems integrated into the wider landscape and seascape.

Overview of Workshop

Discussions on how Canada as a whole should track the qualitative elements of Aichi Target 11 were initiated at the Fredericton workshop and will be further developed by sub-committees. The Yellowknife workshop will focus on global state-of-the art tracking of and reporting on the remaining elements. Through presentations and discussions, the CCEA will discuss a process to measure whether protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures are:

  • equitably managed to achieve biodiversity conservation; and
  • well-connected and integrated within wider landscapes and seascapes.

The CCEA will also provide updates on progress towards determining a process to measure whether networks of protected areas and other effective area-based conservation measures include areas that are:

  • of particular importance for biodiversity and ecosystem services;
  • ecologically representative; and
  • effectively managed to achieve biodiversity conservation.

Experts will present on the scientific basis and need for equitable management and well-connected and integrated sites to ensure the conservation of biodiversity. Jurisdictional representatives will also be asked to share how they currently look at and measure progress towards these elements. Together, workshop participants will develop science-based guidance on how Canada as a whole should track these final elements, what steps the CCEA should take to incorporate these aspects into national reporting, and the suitability of using the Conservation Areas Reporting and Tracking System (CARTS) for doing so.

The workshop will also be used to de-brief the recent and upcoming international work of the CCEA including the IUCN World Conservation Congress, 2017 Pan-Canadian Conference, the National Aichi Target 11 steering committee/working group, the global task force on the development of a definition and guidance for ‘other effective area-based conservation measures’, and national and international groups on marine protected areas network planning.  Updates will also be provided on the pilot voluntary peer-review process for case studies to be incorporated into the Canadian Guidebook for the Application and Reporting of IUCN Protected Area Categories and Other Effective Area-based Conservation Measures, and the progress of the Guidebook itself.

The workshop will be a unique opportunity for conservation experts to come together and develop solutions for achieving Aichi Target 11 and Canada’s Target 1 in all respects. Workshop participants will include experts from Canadian federal, provincial, and territorial protected area and conservation agencies, international agencies, scientists, land stewardship groups, experts in Aboriginal and community land-use planning, and national non-governmental conservation organizations.

Participation

Participation is open to the community-at-large but space may be limited. The CCEA will contact organizations if the number of participants per organization needs to be limited due to space restrictions.

Participants will be expected to provide their best, objective, science-based input to the workshop, and not to represent agency or organizational positions.

Outcomes

Results of the workshop will include a path forward on the tracking and reporting of all elements on Aichi Target 11 and Canada`s Target 1. This will be described in a workshop report and may lead to the identification of new CCEA projects or working groups.

As always, CCEA workshops and conferences provide the opportunity to establish and build connections among the network of protected area specialists across Canada. The final day of the workshop will be devoted to jurisdictional reporting and a roundtable, allowing practitioners to share progress, knowledge, and experiences with each other.

Dates and Location

The workshop will take place from October 24th to 27th, 2016 at the Explorer Hotel, Yellowknife, NT. CCEA members, including Directors, Associate Directors and Jurisdictional Representatives, are invited to the CCEAs 2016 Annual General Meeting the morning of October 28th, 2016.

15 rooms  has  been  reserved under the “CCEA” with a  special  room  rate  of  $190  or  $159  (for  government  employees).  Please  call the Explorer Hotel directly to have one of the CCEA reserved rooms assigned to you.  Note: This is not a group booking and there is no code to provide the hotel. Hotel  room  cancellations  may  be  made  up  to  24  hours  prior  to  check-in,  so  you  are  encouraged  to  book  your  room  even  if  you  haven’t  confirmed your  participation.  For more information please refer to the workshop registration form, which accompanies your invitation.

Workshop Organizing Committee

Claudia Haas – CCEA Secretary – Northwest Territories
Jessica Elliott – CCEA Vice-Chairperson – Yukon
Maryse Bourgeois – CCEA Jurisdictional Representative – New Brunswick
Jason Kelly- CCEA Director – Manitoba
Natalie Ban – CCEA Associate Director – University of Victoria
Robert Hélie – CCEA Vice-Chairperson: Government Relations

Preliminary Program at a Glance (subject to change)

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